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Rencontre automnale 2024 de l'INTRIQ

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Fall 2024 INTRIQ meeting

date

October 15, 2024 11:00 AM

-

October 16, 2024 4:30 PM

Date

October 15, 2024 11:00 AM

-

October 16, 2024 4:30 PM

billet

$

Incription gratuite pour les membres

Ticket

$

Free registration for members

Free Admission

lieu de l'événement

Hôtel Château Bromont

event location

Hôtel Château Bromont

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Rencontre automnale 2024 de l'INTRIQ

Programme préliminaire

15 octobre

10h55  Mot d'ouverture (Salon A)

11h00  Présentation (Salon A)

12h00  Dîner (Salle Knowlton)

13h30 Présentation (Salon A)

14h15  Présentation (Salon A)

14h40 Présentation (Salon A)

15h00 Pause café (Salon C)

15h30 Présentation (Salon A)

16h00 Présentation (Salon A)

17h00 Session d'affiches avec rafraîchissements (Salon C)

19h30 Souper INTRIQ (Salle Knowlton)

16 octobre

9h00  Présentation (Salon A)

10h00 Présentation (Salon A)

10h30 Pause café (Salon C)

11h00 Présentation (Salon A)

12h00 Dîner (Salle Knowlton)

13h30 Présentation (Salon A)

14h30 Pause café (Salon C)

15h00 Présentation (Salon A)

15h45 Présentation (Salon A)

16h05 Présentation (Salon A)

16h25 Mot de fermeture (Salon A)

Conférenciers invités

Conférenciers INTRIQ

Affiches

Arthur Dupré

Étudiant à la maîitrise, Université de Montréal
Directeur: Philippe St-Jean
Understanding the statistical fluctuations of a photonic field
Measuring the statistical fluctuation of an observable is done through the calculation of statistical cumulants, such as the variance. Recently, several theoretical works have shown that these statistical cumulants depend on the geometry of the sub-region of space in which they are measured. The aim of this research project is to build a quantum imaging setup for studying the evolution of intensity fluctuations in a photonic field. The first part of the project is to build a set-up for imaging one and only one pulse of entangled photons. The second is to analyze the spatial fluctuations of these single pulses. This will enable us to study the transition from the classical, Gaussian regime to the quantum, poissonian or sub-poissonian regime, and to investigate the emergence of universal laws describing the evolution of statistical cumulants. This project will provide the technical means to study the transition between the classical and quantum worlds, based on the statistical properties of measured fluctuations.

Azin Aghdaei

Postdoc, Université de Montréal
Directeur: Philippe St-Jean
Sujet à venir

Gabriel Demontigny

Doctorant, Polytechnique Montréal
Directeur: Denis Seletskiy
Field-Sensitive Detection of fs-Pulses in the Mid-Infrared Using Sub-Cycle Electron Tunneling
A recent advancement in photonics is the use of electron tunneling to directly detect the electric field of an optical pulse. Since tunneling through a nano-gap is a highly nonlinear process with respect to the electric field applied, the created electron bursts emitted are shorter than the period of oscillation of the optical field applied. Thus, these bursts of electron can probe the electric field of an incoming wave on a sub-cycle scale. Due to the nature of the tunneling process, the mid-infrared spectral region has an advantage for efficient electron transport. In this work, we will present our advancement in the field resolved detection of mid-infrared pulses, towards the detection of quantum states of light.

Jérémy Peltier

Doctorant, Université de Montréal
Directeur: Philippe St-Jean
Anomalous Quantum Hall Effect for Light in Photonic Crystals
The ability to emulate exotic states of matter with light has open the door to the realization of topological phases of matter that are very difficult to study in the solid-state. Here, we investigate photonic crystals with a deformed honeycomb lattice. This deformation induces artificial gauge fields at the Dirac points such that we can have effective electric and/or magnetic fields (depending on the deformation) acting on the light in the crystal. Using the simulation module MPB (Mit Photonic Bands), we observe Landau levels and the anomalous Hall effect for light, i.e. a non-reciprocal displacement of a light wavepacket. For the latter, we also show that the direction of the Hall deviation depends on the circular polarization of the light. In the near future, we envision harnessing this chiral routing of light for entangling remote solid-state impurities.

Samuel Wolski

Doctorant, Université de Sherbrooke
Directeur: Mathieu Juan
Sujet à venir

Fall 2024 INTRIQ meeting

Preliminary schedule

October 15th

10:55  Opening remarks (Salon A)

11:00  Talk (Salon A)

12:00  Lunch (Knowlton room)

13:30 Talk (Salon A)

14:15  Talk (Salon A)

14:40 Talk (Salon A)

15:00 Coffee break (Salon C)

15:30 Talk (Salon A)

16:00 Talk (Salon A)

17:00 Poster session with refreshments (Salon C)

19:30 INTRIQ dinner (Knowlton room)

October 16th

9:00  Talk (Salon A)

10:00 Talk (Salon A)

10:30 Coffee break (Salon C)

11:00 Talk (Salon A)

12:00 Lunch (Knowlton room)

13:30 Talk (Salon A)

14:30 Coffee break (Salon C)

15:00 Talk (Salon A)

15:45 Talk (Salon A)

16:05 Talk (Salon A)

16:25 Closing remarks (Salon A)

Invited speakers

INTRIQ speakers

Posters

Arthur Dupré

Master student, Université de Montréal
Director: Philippe St-Jean
Understanding the statistical fluctuations of a photonic field
Measuring the statistical fluctuation of an observable is done through the calculation of statistical cumulants, such as the variance. Recently, several theoretical works have shown that these statistical cumulants depend on the geometry of the sub-region of space in which they are measured. The aim of this research project is to build a quantum imaging setup for studying the evolution of intensity fluctuations in a photonic field. The first part of the project is to build a set-up for imaging one and only one pulse of entangled photons. The second is to analyze the spatial fluctuations of these single pulses. This will enable us to study the transition from the classical, Gaussian regime to the quantum, poissonian or sub-poissonian regime, and to investigate the emergence of universal laws describing the evolution of statistical cumulants. This project will provide the technical means to study the transition between the classical and quantum worlds, based on the statistical properties of measured fluctuations.

Azin Aghdaei

Postdoc, Université de Montréal
Director: Philippe St-Jean
Subject to be announced

Gabriel Demontigny

PhD student, Polytechnique Montréal
Director: Denis Seletskiy
Field-Sensitive Detection of fs-Pulses in the Mid-Infrared Using Sub-Cycle Electron Tunneling
A recent advancement in photonics is the use of electron tunneling to directly detect the electric field of an optical pulse. Since tunneling through a nano-gap is a highly nonlinear process with respect to the electric field applied, the created electron bursts emitted are shorter than the period of oscillation of the optical field applied. Thus, these bursts of electron can probe the electric field of an incoming wave on a sub-cycle scale. Due to the nature of the tunneling process, the mid-infrared spectral region has an advantage for efficient electron transport. In this work, we will present our advancement in the field resolved detection of mid-infrared pulses, towards the detection of quantum states of light.

Jérémy Peltier

PhD student, Université de Montréal
Director: Philippe St-Jean
Anomalous Quantum Hall Effect for Light in Photonic Crystals
The ability to emulate exotic states of matter with light has open the door to the realization of topological phases of matter that are very difficult to study in the solid-state. Here, we investigate photonic crystals with a deformed honeycomb lattice. This deformation induces artificial gauge fields at the Dirac points such that we can have effective electric and/or magnetic fields (depending on the deformation) acting on the light in the crystal. Using the simulation module MPB (Mit Photonic Bands), we observe Landau levels and the anomalous Hall effect for light, i.e. a non-reciprocal displacement of a light wavepacket. For the latter, we also show that the direction of the Hall deviation depends on the circular polarization of the light. In the near future, we envision harnessing this chiral routing of light for entangling remote solid-state impurities.

Samuel Wolski

PhD student, Université de Sherbrooke
Director: Mathieu Juan
Subject to be announced

Event Recording