Les activités de l'INTRIQ

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mai 15, 2018

Spring 2018 INTRIQ meeting, May 15 & 16th

At Hotel Château Bromont

Organizers:
   Pr Bertrand Reulet, Université de Sherbrooke
   Pr Glen B. Evenbly, Université de Sherbrooke

90, rue Stanstead, Bromont QC J2L 1K6
Téléphone : 1 800 304 3433

Note : The INTRIQ Business meeting (reserved for members) will be held in room "Salle des cantons" on May 15th from 9h30 to 10h30

Registration

Chartered bus Berri-Bromont-Berri

Carpooling

janv. 9, 2018

CONFETI (CONFérence ÉTudiante de l'INTRIQ) is a yearly student conference sponsored by the INTRIQ. It attracts graduate students and post-docs in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering working on quantum computing related projects.

 

Where and when
The conference will take place on January 9-11, 2018 at the Hôtel Château Bromont in Bromont, Québec.

Schedule

Click here

Registration

Click here

nov. 9, 2017

At Hotel Château Bromont

Organizers:

Dr. Jérôme Bourassa, Cégep de Granby
Dr. Olivier Landon-Cardinal, McGill University

90, rue Stanstead, Bromont QC J2L 1K6
Téléphone : 1 800 304 3433

Note : The INTRIQ Business meeting (reserved for members) will be held in room "Salle des cantons" on November 9th from 9h30 to 10h30

Registration

Chartered bus Berri-Bromont-Berri (Departure from gate #3 at Berri on Nov. 9th at 9h00 AM)

Carpooling 

 

Institut Transdisciplinaire d'Information Quantique (INTRIQ)

mai 15, 2018
Posté par : Marc Leclair

Spring 2018 INTRIQ meeting


Spring 2018 INTRIQ meeting, May 15 & 16th

At Hotel Château Bromont

Organizers:
   Pr Bertrand Reulet, Université de Sherbrooke
   Pr Glen B. Evenbly, Université de Sherbrooke

90, rue Stanstead, Bromont QC J2L 1K6
Téléphone : 1 800 304 3433

Note : The INTRIQ Business meeting (reserved for members) will be held in room "Salle des cantons" on May 15th from 9h30 to 10h30

Registration

Chartered bus Berri-Bromont-Berri

Carpooling

 Detail meeting program will be available soon

May 15th

11h00 - Opening remarks (Salon A)

11h00 - Talks (Salon A)

12h00 - Lunch  (Dining room - 4 Canards)

13h30 - Talks (Salon A)

15h00 - Coffee break  (Salon B)

15h20 - Talks (Salon A)

17h00 - Poster sesson with refreshments (Salon B)

19h30 - INTRIQ dinner (Salon C)

May 16th

9h00 - Talks (Salon A)

10h30 - Coffee break (Salon B)

10h50 - Talks (Salon A)

12h00 - Lunch   (Dining room - 4 Canards)

13h30 - Talks (Salon A)

16h00 - Closing remarks

INVITED SPEAKERS

John Mattsson
Ericsson Research

Pr William Witczak-Krempa
Université de Montréal

Pr Eva Dupont-Ferrier
Université de Sherbrooke

Pr Max Hofheinz
Université de Sherbrooke
Quantum microwave devices based on inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling
In superconducting quantum circuits the Josephson junction is the key element because it is the only strongly nonlinear and dissipationless circuit element we know. Usually it is used in the superconducting state where it acts as a nonlinear inductor. But a small Josephson junction can be nonlinear and dissipationless also when a non-zero DC voltage below the gap is applied. In this case a Cooper pair current can flow through the junction when the energy 2eV of a tunneling Cooper pair can be dissipated in the linear circuit surrounding it, in the form of photons emitted into one or several of its modes. In this inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling regime, the junction acts as a nonlinear drive on the linear circuit. We have tailored this physics into quantum microwave sources, such as single photon sources and measurement devices, such as quantum limited amplifiers. I will show that while these devices tend to be much less coherent than their counter parts using the Josephson junction in the zero-voltage state of the junction, they still allow for quantum-limited performance and more readily accept very open configurations allowing for high bandwidth.

Dr Miles Stoudenmire
Flatiron Institute - Center for Computational Quantum Physics (CCQ)
Classical and Quantum Machine Learning with Tensor Networks
Over the last decade, there have been enormous gains in machine learning technology primarily driven by neural networks. A major reason neural networks have outperformed older techniques is that the cost of optimizing them scales well with the size of the training dataset. But neural networks have the drawback that they are not very well understood theoretically.

Recent work by several groups has explored an alternative approach to creating machine learning model functions based on tensor networks, which are a technique developed in physics to parameterize complicated many-body quantum wavefunctions. The cost of training tensor network models scales similarly to the cost of training neural networks. In addition, their relatively simple, linear structure has provided good theoretical understanding of their properties, and underpins many powerful techniques to optimize and manipulate them. 

After introducing tensor network machine learning models, I will discuss some of the techniques to optimize them and results for supervised and generative machine learning tasks. Then I will discuss a recent tensor network based proposal to formulate hybrid quantum-classical algorithms for machine learning with quantum computers.

Dr Dave Touchette
Institute for Quantum Computing and Perimeter Institute
Interactive Quantum Information Theory
Shannon’s information theory has revolutionized our approach towards two prominent problems in unidirectional communication: source compression and noisy coding. 
Over the last two decades, there has been significant progress made towards developing quantum analogues for these.

Meanwhile, an interactive information theory has also been developed over the last two decades for two-way classical communication problems, both for analogues of source compression and for noisy channel coding.
Two-way quantum communication has also been studied in depth over that span, providing unconditional quantitative quantum advantages. (Even exponential ones!)

In this talk, I will discuss the development in recent years of an interactive quantum information theory to study two-way quantum communication. 
In particular, I will discuss how we can maintain quantum advantage for two-way communication over noisy quantum communication channels.

 

 

POSTER SESSION

Édouard Pinsolle
Professional, Université de Sherbrooke
Director: Bertrand Reulet
Non-Gaussian Current Fluctuations in a Short Diffusive Conductor
We report the measurement of the third moment of current fluctuations in a short metallic wire at low temperature. The data are deduced from the statistics of voltage fluctuations across the conductor using a careful determination of environmental contributions. Our results at low bias agree very well with theoretical predictions for coherent transport with no fitting parameter. By increasing the bias voltage we explore the cross-over from elastic to inelastic transport.

Maxime Tremblay
Master, Université de Sherbrooke
Director: David Poulin
A tensor network approach to coding theory
This work is based on two recent developments in information theory and many-body physics. The first one being the introduction of capacity achieving error correcting codes named polar codes by Erdal Arikan in 2009 and the second one being the introduction of branching MERA by Glen Evenbly and Guifre Vidal in 2014. Later in the same year, it has been shown by Andy Ferris and David Poulin that the task of decoding can be map to contracting a tensor network. Therefore, it is possible to design an efficient decoder by finding an efficiently contractable tensor network. Based on that idea, it was possible to generalize polar codes to a broad family of codes called branching MERA codes that we can decode in an efficient manner using the so called successive cancellation decoder. Here we present the methods and software that we developed in order to analyse codes in that family and the underlying theory that allows us to link error correcting codes and tensor networks.

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